Doc’s Blog

Dr. Andry’s Band Blog

All About Percussion

This page is all about percussion.  Look for links to great percussion sites, along with upcoming podcasts and more.

For starters, here is a great link to Vic Firth’s site that shows the correct way to hold the left hand for traditional grip. http://www.vicfirth.com/education/articles/wesselsgrip2.html

Every drummer (percussionist) should have the Vic Firth site saved to their favorites! Here is the important link to Vic Firth’s 40 Rudiments:

http://www.vicfirth.com/education/rudiments.php

Here are a couple of really cool links to Jeff Queen on Vic Firth’s site. First is a podcast about paradiddles. http://www.vicfirth.com/podcasts/marching/queen_paradiddle_build.html

The second is about Vic Firth Artist, Jeff Queen. This dude is super cool and you need to download all his videos.  In fact you can subscribe to all the Vic Firth videos (podcasts) by clicking on the link in my blogrolls.

http://www.vicfirth.com/artists/queen.html

Check out the Jeff Prosperie video on the Blogroll.  Jeff is a former student of my Mom’s who currently plays in the U.S. Army Band.  He won the DCI solo snare drum competion in the 2007.

The following videos are of our St. Michael drum line playing our cadences.  This is very beneficial to all incoming freshmen.  You need to listen to these as much as you can.  I’ve included a full sequence of Bleu Raiders, Bleu Bells, and Engine Number 9.  I’ve also put our warmups, and individual parts for you to study.  Check out the hand positions, grips, etc.   The music for these can be downloaded from the audition page.  Notice that the part varies in a few spots from the printed part.

http://crackle.com/c/Music/Bleu_Tenor/2152072#ml=fi%3D%26fu%3D2342139

http://crackle.com/c/Music/Bleu_Raiders_Bass/2152131#ml=fi%3D%26fu%3D2342139

http://crackle.com/c/Music/The_Bleus/2161625#ml=fi%3D%26fu%3D2342139

http://crackle.com/c/Music/Bleau_Snare/2161650#ml=fi%3D%26fu%3D2342139

Most incoming freshmen have a more realistic chance to make our drumline as a bass drummer, cymbal player, or frontline player.  Pay particular attention to how we do multiple bass drum parts.

Here is a Marching Percussion feature called Cheetah.  It’s still in the rehearsal stage so it isn’t clean yet, but check it out anyway. http://www.crackle.com/c/Music/Cheetah/2212894#ml=fi%3D%26fu%3D2342139

We don’t just play the drums!  Check out a pair of our students (one of them an outstanding football and basketball player) playing a short version of Fur Elise.

http://crackle.com/c/Music/Fur_Elise/2161561#ml=fi%3D%26fu%3D2342139

Now check out these percussion blogs. http://percussioneducationonline.com/ and http://thirdstream.musiced.net/

4 Comments

  1. Doc Andry, You told me at the Drumline Clinic I needed to get bigger drum sticks. I went to Zeagler’s Music & there are so many different types & sizes of drum sticks, I still do Not know which ones to get. Please let me know! Thank you very Much!
    Jerick

  2. Vic Firth Corpsmaster Ralph Hardimon Drumsticks

  3. The following is a short piece of my English class essay. Each of us went to a concert and wrote a report on how they did. Mine was on your performance on March 11 at S.J.V. church.
    I thought y’all would like it.
    Keep up the good work 🙂

    Contrary to popular belief, not all drummers are loud and unrefined, and this percussion group made that obvious through their interpretation of Morten Lauridsen’s O Magnum Mysterium. Using quick and controlled strikes on their instruments, the percussionists were able to raise a solid and steady resonance from the silence. Proving their talent, they effortlessly glided between the keys of the xylophones as they played in perfect time with each other. The players were able to skillfully mesh together their dynamics, allowing the different tonalities of the instruments to naturally equalize the song. The chimes, introduced near the middle of the song, not only added a resounding affect to the notes and gave the song a brighter structure, but they were also symbolic of the church bells that rang right outside of the church they played in. With the combination of the marimba, vibraphone, xylophones, and chimes, the song shook the church with joyful vibration. Being a percussionist myself, I found this piece particularly impressive. I’m personally honored to have played with and taught some of those percussionists during my high school experience.

  4. Hey Dr.Andry……..I’m a former LSU Tiger Band drummer and would like to talk with you about helping out with the Drum Line at SMHS.

    Currently playing Bass Drum with Baton Rouge Caledonian Pipes & Drums.

    Sending my Drumming Resume’ to you at the Kandry@smhsbr.org address.

    E-mail : williammax@cox.net
    Cell Phone: 225-210-0735, 850-377-7655

    BTW, I’m right across the street from the school on Spotsylvania Dr.

    Thanks……….William

    WILLIAM MAXWELL WALLACE

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